Cracked Emerald

november POP-UP EXHIBITION

SEASON IS PROUD TO PRESENT cracked Emerald, a two person show with work by Seattle artists James Cicatko and John Radtke.  Cracked Emerald WILL EXHIBIT NEW SCULPTURE AND DRAWINGS and WILL OPEN IN THE PROLE DRIFT SPACE AT 523 SOUTH MAIN ST., SEATTLE.  THIS POP-UP SHOW WILL RUN FOR three days ONLY WITH AN OPENING RECEPTION ON thursday November 6, 5:30-8PM.  REGULAR HOURS WILL BE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY, 11-5:30, November 6-8 AND BY APPOINTMENT.

By the time the sun comes up, I have been awake for hours.  I’m not sleeping anymore and lying in bed has become pointless so I just sit in the dining room and look at the dark.  My mind wanders and I figure things out and I make lists and I remember absent friends.  The trees out front are just becoming visible and it reminds me of some party I went to when I was maybe twenty.  This girl Lisa was there with my friend Kevin.  All I really remember is I had on a pink wool sweater that I had just bought at a thrift store.  I cut off the cuffs so the sleeves went just below my elbows and I think I cut some of the collar too.  It was late spring and already temperatures were into the low eighties and humid.  I sat on the front stairs and chain-smoked and acted all cool when people arrived.

 

JAMES CICATKO, MARIA THERESA, 2014, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 6 X 7 INCHES.

JAMES CICATKO, MARIA THERESA, 2014, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 6 X 7 INCHES.

James Cicatko is a Seattle artist with an MFA from The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  His work has been seen in numerous galleries in the Pacific Northwest as well as Torino, Italy; and Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

 

John Radtke, Bridge Self, 2014,  Blackened steel, 45 x 17 x 16 inches.

John Radtke, Bridge Self, 2014, Blackened steel, 45 x 17 x 16 inches.

John Radtke is a 2013 graduate from Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle Washington.  Earlier this year he was awarded a Jentel Artist Residency.  His work has been seen at Soil Gallery in Seattle, Washington; and Breeze Block in Portland, Oregon.

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PRIVACY SETTINGS

SEPTEMBER POP-UP EXHIBITION

SEASON is proud to present its first solo show of Seattle artist Dylan Neuwirth.  PRIVACY SETTINGS will exhibit new sculpture, neon and drawings.  PRIVACY SETTINGS will open in the Prole Drift space at 523 South Main St., Seattle.  This pop-up show will run for two weeks only with an opening reception on Friday September 5, 5:30-8pm.  Regular hours will be Thursday to Saturday, 11-5:30, September 4-13 and by appointment.

 

Im going out cause my bae disconnected the internet.  After all the betrayals and traumatic shit and sadness ive experienced this is honestly a cake walk :-/  how u gonna get in on this how u gonna understand and make some timeline? Not even tryna memorize, it all come back.  Finding it hard to stay in my lane rn. Tryna be positive rn nobody kare rn bye. :D

Dylan Neuwirth, LOL Crackpipes, 2013, blown glass, wood, hardware, 13 x 26 inches overall, edition of 5.

Dylan Neuwirth, LOL Crackpipes, 2013, blown glass, wood, hardware, 13 x 26 inches overall, edition of 5.

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DARK ALL OVER EUROPE

Summer 2014

SEASON is proud to present DARK ALL OVER EUROPE featuring new oil paintings by Philip Miner.

Corday rolls over in her grave.  There is nothing new, or at least there is nothing new to try.  The coffin walls shrink in a bit, expand in a wrong direction, only to shrink again.  Confinement, then release–the act of painting, the tiny death of showing.  Above her, the world continues, caring less and less about this wretched fate.  With each attempt towards memory, another failure, another beheading.

There’s nothing specific, but the paintings will be a bit reflective of the endgame of painting that was reached by some in the minimalist project.  One question that comes up is how is it possible to make anything new, especially in abstraction?  Who cares?  A beheading in abstraction should be welcomed.  These artifacts are missing a few parts or perhaps they hold the memory of a form.  Again, who cares?

Philip Miner lives in Seattle, Washington. He received his MFA in 2006 from the Milton Avery Gradate School of the Arts at Bard College, and has exhibited at numerous venues in the Northwest.

Philip Miner, Profit Cher, Prophète, 2014, flashe with ink-jet print on fabric, 24 X 20 inches each.

Philip Miner, Profit Cher, Prophète, 2014, flashe with ink-jet print on fabric, 24 X 20 inches each.

Philip Miner, One by Four & Four Minus One or Two, Maybe More. 2014, acrylic and flashe on canvas, 16 X 20 inches.

Philip Miner, One by Four & Four Minus One or Two, Maybe More. 2014, acrylic and flashe on canvas, 16 X 20 inches.

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UP EVERY EVENING

spring 2014

There is a poison in me.  It scratches at my fingertips and chokes the back of my throat.  It rides my thoughts and every action with a silent anger and it wants out.  It is a rage that sees destruction as a means to rebuilding.  Within the space of one second it wipes out this world while it makes a new one begin.  I look at you and force myself to smile a little, in my mind I see you collapse and vanish along with everyone and everything.  I have no heart, no lungs; my chest is so tight I can only mouth breath.  The few muscles I have left will close my eyes but sleep is impossible.  I go candy playing and I go rainbow chasing and I beg tomorrow to serve me better.

Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2006-7, ink and graphite on paper, 24 x 19 inches.

Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2006-7, ink and graphite on paper, 24 x 19 inches.

Laylah Ali was born in Buffalo, New York and earned an M.F.A. from Washington University in St. Louis in 1994.  Ali also studied at the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine.  She was featured in solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; ICA, Boston; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis; Institute of International Visual Arts, London; Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, and MASS MoCA, among others, as well as showing her works at such exhibitions as the Venice Biennale and the Whitney Biennial. Laylah Ali is also a featured artist in the PBS series Art: 21—Art in the Twenty-First Century.  SEASON is grateful to Miller Yezerski gallery, Boston, for the loan of this work.

Dylan Neuwirth, Feeling Some Type of Way, 2014, neon, 45 x 5 x 3 inches.

Dylan Neuwirth, Feeling Some Type of Way, 2014, neon, 45 x 5 x 3 inches.

Dylan Neuwirth graduated from the University of Georgia, Athens in 2000.  He has had solo shows at Vermillion, Punch Gallery and Bumbershoot (Seattle) and On Main Gallery (Vancouver) as well as numerous group shows across the west coast.  He creates a variety of angst-filled artworks, many of which address themes of social alienation, apathy and a desire for freedom.  His strength lies in his ability to tweak the reality we think we know and present an alternate version of a truth.

Andy Wauman, THEY'LL USE CLUBS TO BEAT THE DREAM THAT FIT, 2014, ink on vintage flag, 19 x 106 inches.

Andy Wauman, THEY’LL USE CLUBS TO BEAT THE DREAM THAT FIT, 2014, ink on vintage flag, 19 x 106 inches.

Andy Wauman lives and works in Antwerp.  His list of exhibitions cross Europe and Asia with solo shows at Deweer Gallery, Otegem, Belgium, Art Statements Gallery, Hong Kong, and The National Museum of Glass, Leerdam, The Netherlands.  He has held residencies at the International Studio and Curatorial Program in New York City; 555 Arts, Detroit; and Rijksakademy for Visual Arts in Amsterdam and recently finished a residency at the Deus Ex Machina Headquarters in Canggu, Bali, Indonesia.  He is an artist who uses language as a means to keep things minimum without becoming a Minimalist.

ELISABETH KLEY: VOLTA NY 2014

 March 6-9, 2014

“In this decade in which the global art market has become more a mongrel affair than a thoroughbred show, when nations and cultures like China, Iran, and fundamentalist Islam are shaking Western sensibilities to their core, Elisabeth Kley’s ability to revitalize ceramic art with an appearance of ancient and far cultural motifs and styles from around the globe is not only timely, it’s in tune with the reappraisal of tradition that is marking much of the art being made abroad and newly introduced to the West. Kley’s work by and large evokes the distance of time and geography without directly appropriating extant cultural designs. Her work is evocative of something we’ve seen somewhere in our travels or on museum visits–at times recalling Persian, Venetian, Florentine, Chinese, and Moroccan design and ornament–but truly articulates no one style or artifact we can name or point to. Similarly, Kley’s glaze paintings recall arabesques, organic vignettes, manuscript illuminations–though her most significant accomplishment is presenting us a richly variegated cross-culturalism that blurs history, lineage, global politics and identities for a generation of global, aesthete-nomads in pursuit of an eclectic and mutable, if resurrected, beauty.”

                                                                                                                             G. Roger Denson, Huffington Post

Elisabeth Kley is a New York artist and writer whose solo exhibitions of ceramics, watercolors, drawings and prints have taken place in the John Tevis Gallery in Paris, France, Georgian National Gallery in Tbilisi, Le Petit Versailles and Rose Burlingham in New York and Momenta Art in Brooklyn. Her group exhibitions include Haunch of Venison, Francis M. Naumann Fine Art, Lesley Heller Workspace, Exit Art and Rupert Goldsworthy Gallery in New York, A. M. Richard Fine Art and Storefront in Brooklyn, Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach and SEASON in Seattle. She has been nominated for several grants, including the Anonymous Was a Woman Award, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Award, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Fellowship, and she was awarded a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant in 1998.

Elisabeth Kley, Large Green and Gold Round Lotus Bottle, 2012, glazed earthenware, 21" high.

Elisabeth Kley, Large Green and Gold Round Lotus Bottle, 2012, glazed earthenware, 21 inches high.

 

Elisabeth Kley, Tangerine Lobed Bottle, 2012, glazed earthenware, 13 inches tall.

Elisabeth Kley, Tangerine Lobed Bottle, 2012, glazed earthenware, 13 inches high.

 

Elisabeth Kley, Large Black and White Three Part Bottle Study with Fans, 2012, ink and graphite on paper, 46 x 35 inches.

Elisabeth Kley, Large Black and White Three Part Bottle Study with Fans, 2012, ink and graphite on paper, 46 x 35 inches.

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PRETTY LITTER

December 5-29, 2013

Season and Prole Drift are pleased to announce the opening of PRETTY LITTER, featuring new paintings by Seattle artists JD Banke.

 

Prole Drift has invited SEASON to exhibit JD Banke in its International District space for the month of December in an effort to build community and expand the sense of cooperation among galleries.  SEASON is excited to have this opportunity and feels it opens the gallery format to other options.

There’s a town where all the homes are mobile homes.  Every kid is tall and skinny and endlessly moping from one empty swimming pool to another.  The sun is always at noon and you can feel the pressure pushing your head into your spine.  Parking lots are flat, superflat.  In fact the whole town is seemingly built on a perfect flat disk.  Nothing moves, but if you push something, it will not stop until it hits one of the numerous dead palm trees or trash cans.  Most of the kids have skateboards and they roll effortlessly from one kitchen to another, raiding refrigerators and mothers’ purses.  They glide by with pockets full of Pepsi and cash and anti-depressants; their long hair swells with the wind and wherever they go, they leave behind the scent of peppermint and fresh cut grass.  Someday soon, this town will buckle, the thin-walled homes will become piles of insulation and aluminum.  The parents will steal toys and torn denim.  They will toss trench coats and notebooks and cans of spray paint into the valleys and move to the top of the hills that look away, and they will drag these kids–their kids–with them to a new town, one less perfect.

JD Banke received his BFA from Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, Washington.  JD’s work has been exhibited at Vignettes and NEPO 5K, additionally his shows have ranged from apartments to coffee shops to hair salons.  SEASON is honored to show this new body of work.

Installation view, PRETTY LITTER

Installation view, PRETTY LITTER

JD Banke, NOT IMPRESSED, 2013, acrylic on paper, 14 x 11 inches,

JD Banke, NOT IMPRESSED, 2013, acrylic on paper, 14 x 11 inches,

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BOYS, JOKES AND THINGS

October 13-December 29, 2013

SEASON is PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE EXHIBITION Boys, Jokes and Things, FEATURING WORK BY Dawn Cerny.

 

Across the room

and over the fireplace

is a mantel our mantle

We place the things on the mantel that hold value to us.

Here is a photo a postcard.

There is a trophy.

We tastefully decorate with homey objects that taste mildly aspirational.

We display soft monuments made of paper and blood and plaster and yarn and limp erections and glue.

A copy of something by Isherwood by Forster by Auden by Döblin.

This is familiar.

This is so familiar it feels embarrassing.

(Maybe humiliating?)

          Two candle sticks over a fireplace.

          A matching mid-century sofa set.

          The sacred and the profane sit on opposite sides of this domestic setting.

          Our home.

          Our domestic setting.

          Again

          Again

          Again

          Again

Dawn Cerny received her BFA from Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle Washington and her MFA at Bard College, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.  Cerny works in a variety of mediums, including painting, printmaking and sculpture.  Her work has been shown at numerous venues including Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, Washington; Or Gallery, Vancouver, Canada; and Night Gallery, Los Angeles, California.  Dawn Cerny was born in Santa Barbara, California and lives in Seattle, Washington and SEASON is honored to show this new work.

Dawn Cerny, Candle Holders, 2012, paper construction with candles, 9 x 4 x 2 inches each.

Dawn Cerny, Candle Holders, 2012, paper construction with candles, 9 x 4 x 2 inches each.

Dawn Cerny, Untitled collage, 2013, screenprint with collage, 13.5 x 17 inches.

Dawn Cerny, Untitled collage, 2013, screenprint with collage, 13.5 x 17 inches.

 ADDITIONAL IMAGES

 

SOFT RAINS

AUGUST 1-31, 2013

SEASON and Prole Drift are pleased to announce the exhibition SOFT RAINS, featuring work by Nicola Ginzel, Louise Lawler, Mike Simi and Ian Toms.  Each artist will present work dealing with our tenuous future and its various outcomes, from optimistic resolution to distrustful self preservation.  The show title is a reflection on Sara Teasdale’s 1920 poem There Will Come Soft Rains which describes nature as it reclaims a battlefield, and in a subtle way alludes to massive human extinction.

 

Nicola Ginzel (New York) will exhibit a collection of small sculptures which rely upon our production systems and turn the unimportant into a New World Talisman.  With just a slight adjustment on some, or hours of obsessive attention on others, she creates objects that anchor us to our past while providing a bellwether to our future.  Nicola Ginzel lives and works in New York City.  She has exhibited nationally and internationally with selected curators such as Lisa Phillips, Bill Arning and Lydia Yee.  Awards include a grant from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, and a residency at Skaftfell Cultural Center in Seydisfjördur, Iceland.  She has been artist assistant to Roni Horn and Donald Lipski as well as teaching artist at the Jewish Museum and the Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt.

 

Louise Lawler (New York) is an International artist, coming to prominence in the 1980s as a member of the Pictures Generation.  Her work deals with issues of context.  For SOFT RAINS, her set of twelve silkscreened champaign flutes will be on exhibit.  Delicate and minimal, they offer hope or resignation, depending on one’s viewpoint.  Six glasses are screened with the English phrase “After The War” and the other six with the French “Apres La Guerre.”  Originally a sanguine toast to the end of WWII and its uncertain outcome, here the phrases become a reminder that although one war has ended, the future may hold others.  Louise Lawler’s work is in numerous important collections including The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney, The Guggenheim, LACMA, The Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Britain, Center Georges Pompidou, Moderna Museet and Kunstalle Hamburg among others.

 

Mike Simi (Chicago) makes highly conceptual artworks that are creatively simple and subtly subversive.  Often his work reveals a known truth wrapped in humor.  For this show we have selected to show “Pill Organizer,” an oversized minimal painting.  As if from the set of THX 1138 and resembling a shield or corporate logo, this exaggeration of an organizer becomes both anonymous and ominous while reminding us of our personal frailties.  Mike Simi has show often in the Pacific Northwest.  He recently finished a residency at Pilchuck Glass School and has been rewarded a residency at S12 Studio, in Bergen Norway.  In October 2013, his work will be exhibited at Charlotte Street Foundation, Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Ian Toms (Seattle) creates paintings that consider a personal iconography in terms of universal expression.  His work is an effort to discover honesty and humility.  For this show, a new, aggressive work will be shown that provokes our optimism and questions its utility.  HIs work has been exhibited at Cornish College of the Arts, Vignettes and SEASON.  This year Mr. Toms’ paintings were the focus of a solo booth installation at VOLTA NY fair, in conjunction with the Armory Fair, and recently, his work was part of the group show “Make Your Own Luck” a joint project by The They Co. and The New Museum, curated by Ballast Projects.

Nicola Ginzel, Mango Element No.18  2002, mango seed, oil pastel, 2 x 4 x .75 inches.

Nicola Ginzel, Mango Element No.18 2002, mango seed, oil pastel,
2 x 4 x .75 inches.

Louise Lawler, set of twelve champagne flutes, date unknown.

Louise Lawler, set of twelve champagne flutes, date unknown.

Mike Simi, Pill Organizer, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 58 x 59 inches.

Mike Simi, Pill Organizer, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 58 x 59 inches.

 

Ian Toms, FERALTEEN (ways to bang), 2012, enamel and tape on scorched canvas, 44 x 33 inches.

Ian Toms, FERALTEEN (ways to bang), 2012, enamel and tape on scorched canvas, 44 x 33 inches.

 Additional images